‘Books’ Category

An excellent comment by Andrew Atherstone on reading history

April 14th, 2014 Posted in Books, Church History, Great Quotes, Historians, Reformation

By Michael A.G. Haykin

In a book review that appeared in the most recent Banner of Truth, Andrew Atherstone, whose work I admire, has this comment regarding Natalie Mears and Alec Ryrie, eds., Worship and the Parish Church in Early Modern Britain (2013)—he is talking about the way the Reformation impacted the Christian in the pew: “The lives of ordinary Christians in the Reformation world were filled with nuance, variety, contradiction and complexity, just as they are today.” So true! Budding historians as well as seasoned authors need to take note.

_______________

Michael A.G. Haykin is the director of the Andrew Fuller Center for Baptist Studies. He also serves as Professor of Church History and Biblical Spirituality at Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. Dr. Haykin and his wife Alison have two grown children, Victoria and Nigel.

Historiae ecclesiasticae collecta: a weekly roundup of blogs, articles, books, and more

April 11th, 2014 Posted in Books

By Dustin Bruce

Blogs

  1. Justin Taylor highlights “10 Key Events: Fundamentalism and Evangelicalism in 20th Century America” on Between Two Worlds.
  2. Nathan Finn posts on “Ten Reasons to Read Jonathan Edwards” on Between the Times.
  3. On The Gospel Coalition, Derek Rishmawy reviews Calvin on the Christian Life by Michael Horton.
  4. Miles Mullin tells how “History Surprises” at The Anxious Bench.
  5. Also on The Anxious Bench, Thomas Kidd discusses “The Quaker Contribution to Religious Liberty.
  6. If you missed this video, go on “A tour of the British Isles in accents.”
  7. Also, watch history in the making on the recent PBS special on “The New Calvinism.”
  8. John Fea, on The Way of Improvement Leads Home, highlights a recent interview by Adam Goodheart on his recent book, The Civil War Awakening.
  9. Fea also points to George Marsden’s recent review of a book he edited, Confessing History.

Recent Book Releases

  1. David Garrioch, The Hugenots of Paris and the Coming of Religious Freedom, 1685–1789. Cambridge.
  2. Jonathan Riley­–Smith, The Crusades: A History, 3rd ed.  Bloomsbury Academic.
  3. Alister Chapman, Godly Ambition: John Stott and the Evangelical Movement (paperback). Oxford.

From the Fuller Center

  1. Contributor, Evan Burns, highlights Francis Wayland’s comments on Adoniram Judson in “We Reap on Zion’s Hill.”
  2. Steve Weaver highlights a recent interview Michael Haykin did on the “Always Ready” radio program.

What did I miss this week?  Share in the comments or on Twitter: @AFCBS or @dustinbruce.

Note: Inclusion of an article, book, or any other form of media on the Historiae ecclesiasticae collecta does not constitute a theological endorsement by the compiler, Michael Haykin, the Andrew Fuller Center or Southern Seminary.

_______________

Dustin Bruce lives in Louisville, KY where he is pursuing a PhD in Biblical Spirituality at Southern Seminary. He is a graduate of Auburn University and Southwestern Seminary. Dustin and his wife, Whitney, originally hail from Alabama.

Historiae ecclesiasticae collecta: a weekly roundup of blogs, articles, books, and more

April 4th, 2014 Posted in Books

By Dustin Bruce

Blogs

  1. On the Bible Mesh blog, David Roach suggests “6 Ways to Start Learning Church History.”
  2. David Filson follows up on a previous post with “Five More Reasons Why You Should Read Jonathan Edwards,” on The Christward Collective.
  3. Consider getting involved with A Jonathan Edwards Encyclopedia, a project of the Jonathan Edwards Center at Yale University.
  4. Check out “History, Providence, and Good News” by Tom Nettles at the Founders blog.
  5. If you missed it, check out this interesting article from Fox News, “1,300-year-old Egyptian mummy had tattoo of Archangel Michael.”
  6. Thomas Kidd, writing at The Anxious Bench, offers sound advice in “The Art of the Book Review.”
  7. Andreas Kostenberger and Justin Taylor offer a convincing proposal in “April 3, AD 33: Why We Believe We Can Know the Exact Date Jesus Died.”
  8. The Fuller Center’s own Steve Weaver offers helpful tips in “Research Tips for Unfamiliar Topics.”
  9. Check out “David Brainerd Went to the Indians” by Fred Sanders on The Scriptorium Daily.
  10. Listen to Albert Mohler interview Myron Magnet on a fascinating new work, At Home With the Founders.

Recent Book Releases

  1. J.I. Packer, Evangelical Influences: Profiles of Figures and Movements Rooted in the Reformation. Hendrickson.
  2. Christopher Barina Kaiser, Seeing the Lord’s Glory: Kyriocentric Visions and the Dilemma of Early Christology. Fortress.
  3. Richard A. Bailey, Race and Redemption in Puritan New England (paperback). Oxford.
  4. Clemens Leonhard and Hermut Lohr, eds, Literature or Liturgy?: Early Christian Hymns and Prayers in Their Literary and Liturgical Context in Antiquity. Mohr Sieback.
  5. Carol Harrison and Caroline Humfress, eds., Being Christian in Late Antiquity. Oxford.

From the Fuller Center

  1. AFC contributor Evan Burns posts on “Uneducated Ministers?”
  2. The audio from Jason Duesing’s lecture series on Adoniram Judson is now available.
  3. Ian Clary introduces blog readers to “Books At A Glance.”

What did I miss this week?  Share in the comments or on Twitter: @AFCBS or @dustinbruce.

Note: Inclusion of an article, book, or any other form of media on the Historiae ecclesiasticae collecta does not constitute a theological endorsement by the compiler, Michael Haykin, the Andrew Fuller Center or Southern Seminary.

_______________

Dustin Bruce lives in Louisville, KY where he is pursuing a PhD in Biblical Spirituality at Southern Seminary. He is a graduate of Auburn University and Southwestern Seminary. Dustin and his wife, Whitney, originally hail from Alabama.

Uneducated Ministers?

April 3rd, 2014 Posted in Baptist Life & Thought, Biblical Spirituality, Books, Missions

By Evan D. Burns

Sometimes theological education can be downplayed as though it were an unnecessary hobby for left-brained seminarians.  Unfortunately, rigorous biblical/theological training can be disparaged and treated as peripheral for “real” ministry to “real” people with “real” problems.  Doctrine divides, Jesus unites; deeds, not creeds; practical application, not propositional truth… so goes the post-modern, anti-authoritarian mantra.  One of the most oft-cited examples supposedly in support of this anti-intellectualism is that Jesus chose uneducated simpletons to be his disciples, not the highfalutin scribes and Pharisees, as though pure spirituality corresponds to untrained simple faith.  However, this is not the case.  Eckhard Schnabel explains in Early Christian Mission vol.1, 277-278:

The calling of the twelve disciples in Galilee must not be burdened with the view that Jesus called uneducated Galileans to the task of preaching and teaching.  It is rather probable that Jesus’ disciples, including the fishermen Simon and Andrew, were educated.

According to John 1:44, Peter, Andrew and Philip came from Bethsaida, an up-and-coming town that was granted the status of a polis in A.D. 30 and was located in the vicinity of the Greek city Caesarea Philippi.  Rainer Riesner argues that people “who grew up in such close proximity to a Hellenistic city must have spoken more than a few scraps of Greek.  Thus John 12:21 presupposes that Philip could speak Greek.”  Andrew, Philip and Simon had Greek names, which may not be coincidental.  Riesner observes, “The Galilean fishermen in Jesus’ group of disciples belonged not to the rural lower class but to the vocational middle class.  As the latter had religious interests, we may assume a certain degree of education in the case of the disciples such as Peter and John….  We may assume that several disciples came from that segment of the Jewish people who displayed religious interests and that they received, like Jesus, a good elementary education in the parental home, in the synagogue and in elementary school.”  A Jew who came from a pious background “had a solid, albeit one-sided, education.  He could read and write and he could retain large quantities of material in his memory by applying simple mnemonic devices….  Whether a boy of the lower classes received an elementary education depended on two preconditions:  the piety of the father and the existence of a synagogue in the village.”

The view that Jesus had untutored disciples is a romantic and entirely unwarranted one.  Note, for example, the calling of Matthew-Levi, a tax collector….  A tax collector belonged to the higher levels of society.  His position presupposed not only that he was wealthy but also that he had…education.

_______________

Evan D. Burns (Ph.D. Candidate, The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary) is on faculty at Asia Biblical Theological Seminary, and he lives in Southeast Asia with his wife and twin sons.  They are missionaries with Training Leaders International.

Announcing “Books At A Glance”

March 28th, 2014 Posted in Books

By Ian Hugh Clary

logoThe Andrew Fuller Center is happy to announce the launch of a new website called Books At A Glance. The purpose of the site is to relieve the frustration that all of us bibliophiles feel: there’s not enough time to read all of the books we want! Books At A Glance is designed to help streamline some of our reading habits by providing summaries, reviews, and author interviews of the latest books in the various theological disciplines.

If you are in the business world you are likely familiar with the concept of “executive reviews.” These are more than a book review, but a proper summary—roughly 7-10 pages—of a book to help readers get a sense of its content, flow, and argument. Books At A Glance capitalizes on this kind of summary. As the promo material says, these summaries enable you to “keep informed and up to date and widen your learning in minutes, without infringing on your schedule.” It also helps you figure out what books you want to purchase in order to dig deeper.

Books At A Glance is run by pastor-theologian Fred Zaspel, author of a number of important works on B. B. Warfield. Its Board of Reference includes Thabiti Anyabwile, Matthew Barrett, D. A. Carson, James Hamilton, Steve Nichols, Tom Schreiner, Carl Trueman, and others.

This is not a totally free website but requires membership for access to some key aspects of what is offered. We really do think that this is a worthwhile resource that will continue to grow and develop as the months go by. It is ideal for busy pastors who don’t have time to read all of the latest from good publishers, it is also useful for scholars who want to keep abreast of the most recent work.

______________

Ian Hugh Clary is finishing doctoral studies at the University of the Free State (Bloemfontein) where he is writing on Arnold Dallimore and the search for a usable past. He is a co-editor (with Steve Weaver) of “The Pure Flame of Devotion: A History of Christian Spirituality (Joshua Press, 2013), a Festschrift in honour of Michael Haykin. He is also a contributor to Gordon L. Heath’s Canadian Churches and the First World War (Pickwick, 2014). Ian has written articles in journals like Scottish Bulletin of Evangelical TheologyMid-America Journal of Theology, and Puritan Reformed Journal. Ian and his wife Vicky have three children, Jack, Molly, and Kate, and live in Toronto where they are members of West Toronto Baptist Church.

Historiae ecclesiasticae collecta: a weekly roundup of blogs, articles, books, and more

March 28th, 2014 Posted in Books

By Dustin Bruce

Blogs

  1. On the Religion in American History blog, Steven P. Miller is interviewed about his upcoming book,The Age of Evangelicalism: America’s Born-Again Years.
  2. In “The Absolute Best Way to Introduce Your Kids (and Yourself) to Church History”, Justin Taylor highlights a current WTS book special. The title says it all!
  3. On The Scriptorium Daily, Fred Sanders posts on “Our Whole Salvation & All Its Parts: Calvin on Union with Christ.”
  4. On his personal blog, Lee Gattiss reviews Crawford Gribben’s Evangelical Millenialism in the Trans-Atlantic World, 1500–2000.
  5. Miles Mullins discusses “Unintended Consequences in American Religious History” on The Anxious Bench blog.
  6. Also at The Anxious Bench, Philip Jenkins puts forth an interesting treatment of an early Christian term in “Counting the Ways.”
  7. A free article from the Journal of Discipleship and Family Ministry, Matt Haste treats “So many voices”: The Piety of Monica, Mother of Augustine.
  8. Tim Challies continues a helpful series with “The False Teachers: Harry Emerson Fosdick.”
  9. On the Ligonier blog, Steve Lawson is interviewed on his new book The Evangelistic Zeal of George Whitefield.
  10. Also, while not restricted to Church History, check out the many helpful resources at Historians Teaching.
  11. While not necessarily a blog, it is worth noting that Southern Seminary’s James P. Boyce Centennial Library recently released a LibGuide on Andrew Fuller. This is a great resource for anyone interested in learning more about Fuller.

Recent Book Releases

  1. Kenneth D. Wald and Allison Calhoun-Brown, Religion and Politics in the United States, seventh edition. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
  2. Sean Martin, The Cathars: The Most Successful Heresy in the Middle Ages. Oldcastle Books.
  3. John Drury, Music at Midnight: The Life and Poetry of George Herbert. The University of Chicago Press.

From the Fuller Center

  1. AFC Fellow,Nathan Finn, posted on the controversial question, “Are Baptists Reformers, Radicals, or Restorationists?
  2. Evan Burns highlighted John Owen in “Preaching from the ‘Spiritual Sense’.”
  3. Joe Harrod continued a series of posts on Samuel Davies with “Samuel Davies on Meditation.”

What did I miss this week?  Share in the comments or on Twitter: @AFCBS or @dustinbruce.

Note: Inclusion of an article, book, or any other form of media on the Historiae ecclesiasticae collecta does not constitute a theological endorsement by the compiler, Michael Haykin, the Andrew Fuller Center or Southern Seminary.

_______________

Dustin Bruce lives in Louisville, KY where he is pursuing a PhD in Biblical Spirituality at Southern Seminary. He is a graduate of Auburn University and Southwestern Seminary. Dustin and his wife, Whitney, originally hail from Alabama.

Historiae ecclesiasticae collecta: a weekly roundup of blogs, articles, books, and more

March 21st, 2014 Posted in Books, Church History, Historians

By Dustin Bruce

Blogs

  1. Thomas Kidd expounds on “George Marsden and the Gift of Clear Writing” over at the Anxious Bench. Speaking of Kidd, don’t miss the Gheens Lectures at Southern Seminary where he will be lecturing on “Faith and Politics: From the Great Awakening to the American Revolution.”
  2. The American Historical Association has recently expanded their Online Directory of History Dissertations, a collection that now includes over 49,000 works.
  3. At The Confessing Baptist, Graham Benyon writes on “The Rise and Development of the English Baptists.”
  4. Also at The Confessing Baptist, check out the first volume in the Journal of the Institute of Reformed Baptist Studies.
  5. Justin Taylor highlighted “God’s Lion in London: Charles Spurgeon and the Challenge of the Modern Age,” Albert Mohler’s recent lecture given at the Nicole Institute for Baptist Studies at RTS.
  6. Over at Comment, the Cardus blog, Joan Lockwood O’Donovan reviews Alan Jacobs new work, The Book of Common Prayer: A Biography.
  7. Ryan Nelson discusses “Simple Language for Simple Truth: The Legacy of J.A. Broadus” on logostalk, where you can find a special on Broadus’ writings for Logos.
  8. On Christianity Today’s Hermeneutics blog, Karen Swallow Prior posts on Hannah More in “The Most Influential Reformer You’ve Never Heard Of.”

Recent Book Releases

  1. Basil of Caesarea (Foundations of Theological Exegesis and Christian Spirituality) by Stephen M. Hildebrand. Baker. $26.99.
  2. The Evangelical Origins of the Living Constitution by John W. Compton. Harvard University Press. $45.00.
  3. A Companion to Global Historical Thought by Prasenjit Duara, Viren Mirthy, and Andrew Satori. Wiley Blackwell. $195.00.
  4. God, Locke, and Liberty: The Struggle for Religious Freedom in the West by Joseph Loconte. Lexington Books. $95.00.
  5. Christian Theology: The Classics edited by Stephen R. Holmes and Shawn Bawulski. Routledge. $26.95

From the Fuller Center

  1. Joe Harrod pointed to Samuel Davies’ thoughts on reading Scripture.
  2. Steve Weaver posted on “Reclaiming St. Patrick’s Day.”
  3. Steve Weaver introduces readers to the ministry of Evan Burns.
  4. Speaking of Evan, he draws from Martin Lloyd-Jones in “Reading from the Long 18th Century.”

What did I miss this week?  Share in the comments or on Twitter: @AFCBS or @dustinbruce.

Note: Inclusion of an article, book, or any other form of media on the Historiae ecclesiasticae collecta does not constitute a theological endorsement by the compiler, Michael Haykin, the Andrew Fuller Center or Southern Seminary.

_______________

Dustin Bruce lives in Louisville, KY where he is pursuing a PhD in Biblical Spirituality at Southern Seminary. He is a graduate of Auburn University and Southwestern Seminary. Dustin and his wife, Whitney, originally hail from Alabama.

Reclaiming St. Patrick’s Day

March 17th, 2014 Posted in Ancient Church: 4th & 5th Centuries, Biblical Spirituality, Books, Church Fathers, Church History, Eminent Christians, Missions

By Steve Weaver
Patrick Cover

Michael Haykin’s new biography of Patrick. See below for a free giveaway opportunity.

We are blessed in our society today to have holidays such as Easter, Christmas, St. Valentine’s Day and St. Patrick’s Day which are filled with Christian significance. Unfortunately, almost all of the Christian meaning for these important markers on the Christian calendar has been forgotten. As much as we Christians like to blame the nebulous society around us, I don’t think it is the “world’s” fault that these holidays have not retained their Christian meaning. Instead, I fault Christians who are either unaware of their heritage or just plain derelict in their duty to educate their children. We shouldn’t expect unbelievers to celebrate Christianity, but we should expect Christians to seek to pass their heritage on to the next generation.

Hopefully you do use the holidays of Christmas and Easter as opportunities to talk to your children about the birth and resurrection of Christ respectively. However, days like St. Valentine’s Day and especially St. Patrick’s Day are often missed opportunities in evangelical homes. Perhaps we’re frightened away by the fact that these individuals are often associated with the Roman Catholic Church. But there is no need to fear Patrick for in him evangelicals have not a foe but a friend.

Patrick was a courageous Christian missionary to Ireland in the 5th century. His story of being kidnapped as a boy in Britain to become a slave in Ireland, his escape back to Britain, and his call as a missionary to return is a fascinating tale of God’s providence and grace. His dedication to the doctrine of the Trinity is both admirable and worthy of emulation. Talking to your children about how Patrick taught the Trinity to the pagans of his day provides a tremendous opportunity to explain this difficult biblical teaching to them. This is an opportunity that should not be missed. Likewise, Patrick’s commitment to take the gospel to unreached peoples (Ireland at the time would have been considered the “end of the world.”) is another important teachable aspect of this remarkable life for our children. Read, in Patrick’s own words, his commitment to take the gospel to Ireland:

I came to the people of Ireland to preach the Gospel, and to suffer insult from the unbelievers, bearing the reproach of my going abroad and many persecutions even unto bonds, and to give my free birth for the benefit of others; and, should I be worthy, I am prepared to give even my life without hesitation and most gladly for his name, and it is there that I wish to spend it until I die, if the Lord would grant it to me. (Confession 37)

In short, St. Patrick should be introduced to our children as a courageous missionary hero who believed and taught the orthodox doctrine of the Trinity.

Many legends are attached to the story of Patrick and though I believe most are grounded in some true events, the discerning reader must be aware of the mixture of legend and history on this early Christian figure. However, we are not dependent merely on legends to know about the life of Patrick. His autobiographical Confession has survived the centuries and is a fascinating recounting of his life.

For those interested in learning more, there is a helpful modern biography of Patrick by Philip Freeman. For parents wanting a good introduction that can be ready by or to their children, I highly recommend Patrick: Saint of Ireland by Joyce Denham. In addition, a new biography of Patrick has been penned by Michael Haykin, which is already available in the UK and is available for pre-order in the US. We are going to give away a free copy of this book today. Enter the contest below!

A few short, but very helpful articles about Patrick’s modern-day relevance are available online.

This post originally appeared on March 17, 2012 on pastorhistorian.com. It has been lightly edited and reposted today on that blog in honor of St. Patrick’s Day 2014.

________________

Steve Weaver serves as a research assistant to the director of the Andrew Fuller Center for Baptist Studies and a fellow of the Center. He also serves as senior pastor of Farmdale Baptist Church in Frankfort, KY. Steve and his wife Gretta have six children.

Historiae ecclesiasticae collecta: a weekly roundup of blogs, articles, books, and more

March 14th, 2014 Posted in Books, Church History, Historians

By Dustin Bruce

Blogs

  1. John Fea continues a helpful series on “How to be a Public Scholar” with a session on blogging at his blog, The Way of Improvement Leads Home.
  2. Over at The Scriptorium Daily, Fred Sanders has linked to a talk he gave in Biola’s chapel on The Fundamentals (1910–1915).
  3. Over at Reformatiom 21, Carl Trueman highlights the recent release of some Reformed base packages by Logos Bible Software. These packages were created with students and scholars of the Reformation in mind.
  4. Tim Challies has released his recent post in a series highlighting “The History of Christianity in 25 Objects.” This time he is looking at Billy Graham’s Prayer Wheel.
  5. Thomas Kidd presents a helpful history of “the Sinner’s Prayer” over at The Anxious Bench.
  6. R. Scott Clark has compiled a section of “Calvin Studies” on the Heidelblog. His newest edition features audio of Scott Manetsch teaching “On Calvin In His Context and Ours.
  7. The Fuller Center’s own Steve Weaver has suggested “Seven Podcasts for a Pastor-Historian” on his blog, Thoughts of a Pastor-Historian.
  8. Speaking of podcasts, on the Beeson Podcast, Timothy George has posted an excellent lecture on “The Legacy of Jonathan Edwards,” given at Beeson by George Marsden. Last week, on another excellent edition, George interviewed John L. Thompson on the subject of the history of exegesis and Calvin’s hermeneutic.
  9. In light of the coming holiday, Timothy Paul Jones asks, “What Happened to the Real St. Patrick?”
  10. Over at The Junto: a Group Blog on Early American History, Jonathan Wilson reminds us that Jonathan Edwards began pastoring, not in Connecticut or Massachusetts, but in New York in “Looking for “a World of Love”: Jonathan Edwards in the Big City.”
  11. Philip Jenkins points to the use of art in telling the history of missions.
  12. Last, but not least, the Confessing Baptist features an interview with Ian Clary and Steve Weaver on the Festschrift they edited in honor of Michael Haykin, The Pure Flame of Devotion.

Recent Book Releases

  1. A Cultural History of Childhood and Family in the Middle Ages (The Cultural Histories Series) by Louise J. Wilkinson.Bloomsbury Academic. 9781472554758. $34.00.
  2. An Able and Faithful Ministry: Samuel Miller and the Pastoral Office by James M. Garreston. Reformation Heritage Books. 9781601782984. $35.00.
  3. Reformed Confessions of the 16th and 17th Centuries in English Translation: Volume 4, 1600–1693 edited by James T. Dennison Jr. Reformation Heritage Books. 9781601782809. $50.00.
  4. A Will to Believe: Shakespeare and Religion (Oxford Wells Shakespeare Lectures) by David Scott Kastan. Oxford University Press. 9780199572892. $40.00.
  5. Holy Warriors: The Religious Ideology of Chivalry (The Middle Ages Series) by Richard W. Kaeuper. University of Pennsylvania Press. 9780812222975. $29.95.
  6. Kierkegaard on the Philosophy of History by Georgios Patios. Palgrave Macmillan. 9781137383273. $95.00.

From the Fuller Center

  1. Contributor Evan Burns highlights the Prince of Preachers in “Spurgeon’s Missiology: Go and Teach Them.
  2. Contributor Steve Weaver points to a new series edited by Michael Haykin on the early church fathers.

What did I miss this week?  Share in the comments or on Twitter: @AFCBS or @dustinbruce. 

Note: Inclusion of an article, book, or any other form of media on the Historiae ecclesiasticae collecta does not constitute a theological endorsement by the compiler, Michael Haykin, the Andrew Fuller Center or Southern Seminary.

_______________

Dustin Bruce lives in Louisville, KY where he is pursuing a PhD in Biblical Spirituality at Southern Seminary. He is a graduate of Auburn University and Southwestern Seminary. Dustin and his wife, Whitney, originally hail from Alabama.

New Series on Early Church Fathers Edited by Michael Haykin

March 14th, 2014 Posted in Ancient Church: 4th & 5th Centuries, Books, Church Fathers, Church History, Eminent Christians, Historians

By Steve Weaver

A new series of books featuring biographies of the early church fathers is being published by Christian Focus Publications of the United Kingdom. Noted Patristic scholar Michael A.G. Haykin is serving as the series editor. According to the publisher’s website:  ”this series relates the magnificent impact that these fathers of the early church made for our world today. They encountered challenges similar to ones that we face in our postmodern world, and they met them with extraordinary values that will encourage and inspire us today.”

Basil CoverThe first volume, authored by Marvin Jones, focuses on Basil of Caesarea. The publisher’s website provides the following description:

Basil of Caesarea (329-379 AD) was a Greek Bishop in what is now Turkey. A thoughtful theologian, he was instrumental in the formation of the Nicene Creed. He fought a growing heresy, Arianism, that had found converts, including those in high positions of state. In the face of such a threat he showed courage, wisdom and complete confidence in God that we would do well to emulate today.

Patrick CoverThe second volume in the series was authored by Haykin and is an exploration of the life and impact of Patrick of Ireland. The publisher’s website provides this description:

Patrick ministered to kings and slaves alike in the culture that had enslaved him. Patrick’s faith and his commitment to the Word of God through hard times is a true example of the way that God calls us to grow and to bless those around us through our suffering. Michael Haykin’s masterful biography of Patrick’s life and faith will show you how you can follow God’s call in your life.

Both these books are available in the UK. They will not be available in the US until May, but are available for pre-order now on Amazon:

Other books scheduled in the series include:

  • Athanasius by Carl Trueman
  • Cyril of Alexandria by Steve McKinion
  • Augustine by Brad Green
  • Irenaeus of Lyons by Ligon Duncan
  • Tertullian by David Robinson

________________

Steve Weaver serves as a research assistant to the director of the Andrew Fuller Center for Baptist Studies and a fellow of the Center. He also serves as senior pastor of Farmdale Baptist Church in Frankfort, KY. Steve and his wife Gretta have six children.