Historia ecclesiastica
The Weblog of Dr. Michael A. G. Haykin & friends

Historiae ecclesiasticae collecta: a weekly roundup of blogs, articles, books, and more

March 14th, 2014 Posted in Books, Church History, Historians

By Dustin Bruce

Blogs

  1. John Fea continues a helpful series on “How to be a Public Scholar” with a session on blogging at his blog, The Way of Improvement Leads Home.
  2. Over at The Scriptorium Daily, Fred Sanders has linked to a talk he gave in Biola’s chapel on The Fundamentals (1910–1915).
  3. Over at Reformatiom 21, Carl Trueman highlights the recent release of some Reformed base packages by Logos Bible Software. These packages were created with students and scholars of the Reformation in mind.
  4. Tim Challies has released his recent post in a series highlighting “The History of Christianity in 25 Objects.” This time he is looking at Billy Graham’s Prayer Wheel.
  5. Thomas Kidd presents a helpful history of “the Sinner’s Prayer” over at The Anxious Bench.
  6. R. Scott Clark has compiled a section of “Calvin Studies” on the Heidelblog. His newest edition features audio of Scott Manetsch teaching “On Calvin In His Context and Ours.
  7. The Fuller Center’s own Steve Weaver has suggested “Seven Podcasts for a Pastor-Historian” on his blog, Thoughts of a Pastor-Historian.
  8. Speaking of podcasts, on the Beeson Podcast, Timothy George has posted an excellent lecture on “The Legacy of Jonathan Edwards,” given at Beeson by George Marsden. Last week, on another excellent edition, George interviewed John L. Thompson on the subject of the history of exegesis and Calvin’s hermeneutic.
  9. In light of the coming holiday, Timothy Paul Jones asks, “What Happened to the Real St. Patrick?”
  10. Over at The Junto: a Group Blog on Early American History, Jonathan Wilson reminds us that Jonathan Edwards began pastoring, not in Connecticut or Massachusetts, but in New York in “Looking for “a World of Love”: Jonathan Edwards in the Big City.”
  11. Philip Jenkins points to the use of art in telling the history of missions.
  12. Last, but not least, the Confessing Baptist features an interview with Ian Clary and Steve Weaver on the Festschrift they edited in honor of Michael Haykin, The Pure Flame of Devotion.

Recent Book Releases

  1. A Cultural History of Childhood and Family in the Middle Ages (The Cultural Histories Series) by Louise J. Wilkinson.Bloomsbury Academic. 9781472554758. $34.00.
  2. An Able and Faithful Ministry: Samuel Miller and the Pastoral Office by James M. Garreston. Reformation Heritage Books. 9781601782984. $35.00.
  3. Reformed Confessions of the 16th and 17th Centuries in English Translation: Volume 4, 1600–1693 edited by James T. Dennison Jr. Reformation Heritage Books. 9781601782809. $50.00.
  4. A Will to Believe: Shakespeare and Religion (Oxford Wells Shakespeare Lectures) by David Scott Kastan. Oxford University Press. 9780199572892. $40.00.
  5. Holy Warriors: The Religious Ideology of Chivalry (The Middle Ages Series) by Richard W. Kaeuper. University of Pennsylvania Press. 9780812222975. $29.95.
  6. Kierkegaard on the Philosophy of History by Georgios Patios. Palgrave Macmillan. 9781137383273. $95.00.

From the Fuller Center

  1. Contributor Evan Burns highlights the Prince of Preachers in “Spurgeon’s Missiology: Go and Teach Them.
  2. Contributor Steve Weaver points to a new series edited by Michael Haykin on the early church fathers.

What did I miss this week?  Share in the comments or on Twitter: @AFCBS or @dustinbruce. 

Note: Inclusion of an article, book, or any other form of media on the Historiae ecclesiasticae collecta does not constitute a theological endorsement by the compiler, Michael Haykin, the Andrew Fuller Center or Southern Seminary.

_______________

Dustin Bruce lives in Louisville, KY where he is pursuing a PhD in Biblical Spirituality at Southern Seminary. He is a graduate of Auburn University and Southwestern Seminary. Dustin and his wife, Whitney, originally hail from Alabama.

This entry was posted on Friday, March 14th, 2014 at 10:30 am and is filed under Books, Church History, Historians. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

Comments are closed.