Archive for May, 2010

Podcast Interview with Dr. Haykin about “Baptists and the Cross”

May 14th, 2010 Posted in Uncategorized

I (Steve Weaver) recently had the opportunity to record a series of podcasts with Dr. Michael A. G. Haykin.  The first of these is attached to this post.  It focuses on the Center’s upcoming conference “Baptists and the Cross:  Contemporary and Historical Perspectives”.  Forthcoming podcasts will feature a discussion of Dr. Haykin’s upcoming book The Empire of the Holy Spirit and an interview by Dr. Haykin with Dr. Stephen Wellum about his upcoming presentation at our conference on “Baptism and Crucicentrism”.

Download Podcast

You can subscribe to this podcast in iTunes using this feed.

Posted by Steve Weaver, Research and Administrative Assistant to the Director of the Andrew Fuller Center for Baptist Studies, Dr. Michael A.G. Haykin.

“Baptists and the Cross” Discounted Conference Rates

May 11th, 2010 Posted in Uncategorized

The fourth annual conference of the Andrew Fuller Center for Baptist Studies is scheduled for August 30-31, 2010.  The theme is:  Baptists and the Cross:  Contemporary and Historical Reflections. The conference will feature speakers such as Danny Akin (president, SEBTS), David Bebbington (professor, University of Stirling), Maurice Dowling (professor,Irish Baptist College), James Fuller (professor, University of Indianapolis), Tom Schreiner (professor, SBTS), Glendon Thompson (president, TBS and pastor of Jarvis Street Baptist Church), and Stephen Wellum (professor, SBTS).  For full bios of the speakers, see here.

Discounted registration rates are now available for the conference and there is a special rate for students.  Students may receive a discounted rate by using the code: “8051974″.  For more information on the conference visithttp://events.sbts.edu/andrewfuller.

Posted by Steve Weaver, Research and Administrative Assistant to the Director of the Andrew Fuller Center for Baptist Studies, Dr. Michael A.G. Haykin.

Jonathan Edwards and Basil of Caesarea on Reflecting the Divine Glory

May 10th, 2010 Posted in Uncategorized

Over at the Jonathan Edwards Society page, Dr. Haykin has posted a comparison between two statements of Jonathan Edwards and Basil of Caesarea.

Posted by Steve Weaver, Research and Administrative Assistant to the Director of the Andrew Fuller Center for Baptist Studies, Dr. Michael A.G. Haykin.

New Site on “Biblical Spirituality”

May 3rd, 2010 Posted in Uncategorized

We are pleased to announce the availability of a new website devoted to the study of biblical spirituality by one of Dr. Haykin’s Ph.D. students.  Please note the letter from the maintainer of this website below:

Dear Brothers,

We have launched a new website called biblicalspirituality.wordpress.com especially devoted to the study of biblical spirituality (Puritan, reformed, and evangelical spirituality in particular).

One purpose of this website is to provide unpublished papers that deal with the subject of spirituality for researchers. Thus, if you have written any paper on the subject that has not yet been published, we encourage you to submit it to us, and we will have it posted here, so that others can also benefit from your work. The paper can be e-mailed to Brian G. Najapfour at najapfour@gmail.com

The ultimate goal of this site is to cultivate holiness in the lives of the believers, especially of pastors. We are convinced that the greatest need of many churches today is the holiness of their pastors. As Robert Murray M’Cheyne (1813-1843) says, “My people’s greatest need is my personal holiness.”

Please join us in this endeavor. Your contribution will be greatly appreciated . Many thanks!

Posted by Steve Weaver, Research and Administrative Assistant to the Director of the Andrew Fuller Center for Baptist Studies, Dr. Michael A.G. Haykin.

Theological education: the fruit in history speaks for itself

May 1st, 2010 Posted in Church History, Theology

There has been a lively interchange going on regarding theological education on my facebook page. This will be my final post on the issue of theological education (though I do intend to write, DV, a small book on the issue).

 

In the early Church context about 12%-15% of the Graeco-Roman world were literate. All of the Church Fathers were drawn from these ranks. They had to have been to be able to use and preach the Word of God.

 

It is very telling that the Reformation leaders were all men trained in the universities. And it is also very telling that the Puritans, all of them apart from Bunyan and Baxter, were university men, with MAs in theology. Very telling indeed. And the impact of the Puritan literature on the 18th century men is well known: it is a major stimulus for revival. And none could accuse the Reformers or the Puritans of not being lovers of the church and ardent pastors.

 

And then the 18th century leaders of the Evangelical awakening: which of them had not been to university? Well, there is Newton and some of the key Baptists like Fuller and Carey. But both of the latter were geniuses.

 

And do we really think in this complex world we will be best served in the church by men without such formal training? We are whistling dixie (no offence to my Southern brothers!) And we all know what happened to Dixie.